January 6 panel looks to wrap up investigation before Republicans take over House – live | American politics


A reminder of some of the unfinished business awaiting the January 6 committee as the end of the year – and the end of its mandate – approach:

First, there’s the matter of Donald Trump, At what was likely its final public hearing last month, lawmakers publicly voted to subpoena the former president’s testimony and documents. While Trump was reportedly open to the idea of ​​appearing publicly before a panel he has no love for, he ultimately decided to challenge the subpoena in court. According to Politicothe panel could as soon as today file its response to his legal challenge.

As is typical for congressional select committees, the panel is expected to release a report detailing how the insurrection happened. It will probably be the most anticipated such document since the 9/11 Commission Report released in 2004.

The committee also has to decide whether to make criminal referrals to the justice department. Several members have hinted that Trump’s actions during the insurrection amounted to criminal acts, and referring him to the justice department would be a consequential step. They could also refer some of his former officials to face charges, while Politico reports that the members are also looking into whether Trump and his allies tampered with witnesses.

Key events

The House GOP may be gearing up to investigate the Biden administration, but first it needs to decide who the chamber’s speaker will be.

Caucus leader Kevin McCarthy is considered a frontrunner, but faced opposition this week during the vote to determine the party’s nominee for the position. While McCarthy prevailed, the episode, coupled with the GOP’s expected razor-thin majority in the chamber, raised the possibility of a contentious speakership election when the new Congress begins on January 3.

Today, right wing congressman Andy Biggs reiterated his opposition to McCarthy’s candidacy. Biggs mounted an unsuccessful challenge to McCarthy in the election held Tuesday for House speaker nominee.

I’ve seen enough.

I cannot vote for Kevin McCarthy as House Speaker.

I do not believe he will ever get to 218 votes, and I refuse to assist him in his effort to get those votes.https://t.co/lyImFCOHgI

— Rep. Andy Biggs (@RepAndyBiggsAZ) November 18, 2022

Joining in the sentiment was fellow conservative congressman Matt Gaetz,

Kevin McCarthy (Establishment-CA) is now reduced to threatening and pressuring incoming freshmen House members to vote for him.

We have the votes to force a change. @RepAndyBiggsAZ makes the case brilliantly here:https://t.co/qpgS2ljzay

Matt Gaetz (@mattgaetz) November 18, 2022

However, Paul Ryanthe last Republican to serve as House speaker, thinks McCarthy will put it off.

“I know all the people. I know the players. I think he’s going to be fine,” Ryan told Politico on Thursday,

While the effort may not end in impeachment, the incoming Republican House majority is already pushing for testimony from top homeland security officials, including Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

GOP lawmakers on the Judiciary Committee sent the department a letter today requesting documents and testimony from a range of officials:

#BREAKING: Judiciary Republicans name potential witnesses from the Department of Homeland Security to take part in transcribed interviews and hearings early in the 118th Congress. pic.twitter.com/Aw4aObOpZA

— House Judiciary GOP (@JudicialGOP) November 18, 2022

Should these hearings occur next year, expect the committee’s new Republican leadership to spend much of their time exploring the situation at the southern border, where migrant arrivals have recently hit records. The GOP has sought to blame the Biden administration for the influx, and will likely use an appearance by Mayorkas and top officials in US Customs and Border Protection to make their case.

Republicans may have retaken the majority in the House, but their narrow margin of control is already affecting their priorities.

One of the consequences is that it’s made it less likely the party will launch impeachment proceedings against Joe Biden or one of his cabinet secretaries, such as the homeland security chief Alejandro Mayorkasor attorney general Merrick Garland, Politicoreports,

The piece has a number of Republicans who hold moderate views or represent swing districts cautioning against attempts to force the Democratic leaders out of office, which would have virtually no chance of succeeding since Biden’s allies still control the Senate.

“I want to warn our colleagues: There may be some activists in our party that want impeachment. But I can tell you that the swing voters and the independent voters don’t. …We change leadership by elections, impeachment is the outlier,” Don Bacon of Nebraska says, expressing a sentiment common among GOP lawmakers quoted in the piece.

Even marjorie taylor greene, one of the most far-right Republicans in Congress, wasn’t quick to endorse impeachment proceedings when approached by Politico. “I think that what we’re going to do is proving everything through investigations and evidence. … So we’ve got to do the work on the committee, but I think there will be plenty of evidence to show that,” Greene said.

While Republicans managed to claw back control of Congress’s lower house last week, The Guardian’s Sam Levine reports Democrats made gains in state legislatures nationwide, with potentially significant consequences for voting and abortion rights:

While Democrats staved off a red wave in Washington during the midterm elections, the party’s most significant victories came far from the US capitol. They were in state legislatures across the country with consequences that would be felt for years to come.

Over the last decade, Republicans have quietly amassed power in state capitols, investing in races for state legislatures that can be decided by just a few hundred votes. It’s an investment that has paid off wildly. Since state legislatures draw electoral districts in many places, Republicans have used that advantage to entrench their power, drawing district lines that further guaranteed their majorities. They’ve also used those majorities to pass measures that make it harder to vote, strip LGBTQ+ protections, loosen gun laws and restrict access to abortion.

Further complicating efforts to hold Donald Trump accountable is his return to the campaign trail. Chris McGreal looks at just how much of a factor his decision might play:

The law is clear. The politics less so.

If Donald Trump’s third run for the White House is propelled by large doses of narcissism and revenge, the former US president must also be hoping that a high-profile political campaign may help keep his myriad legal problems at bay before they bury him.

Prosecutors from New York to Georgia and Washington DC have spent months digging into an array of alleged crimes before, during and after Trump was president. Some of those investigations are coming to fruition with indictments expected to follow within months, possibly weeks, on charges that could potentially see Trump become the first former US president to go to prison.

His declaration that he is once again a candidate changes nothing under the law. Legal minds broadly agree that while a sitting president is protected from prosecution in office, that immunity disappears when they leave the White House.

But then there is the politics of a prosecution against a presidential candidate who has already dismissed the investigations of his attempts to overturn the 2020 election, the hoarding of top secret documents, and allegedly fraudulent business practices, as “politically motivated” and a Democratic “ witch-hunt”.

Here’s more from The Guardian’s Hugo Lowell on the issue of the January 6 committee’s criminal referrals, which might be its most consequential piece of unfinished business:

The House Jan. 6 select committee has created a subcommittee to examine the scope of potential criminal referrals it might make to the Justice Department over the Capitol attack as well as what materials to share with federal prosecutors, its chairman and other members said on Thursday.

The special subcommittee – led by Congressman Jamie Raskin, overseeing a four-person group that also involves Liz Cheney, Adam Schiff and Zoe Lofgren – has been chiefly focused on whether they have uncovered sufficient evidence that former US president Donald Trump violated civil and criminal statutes. .

The subcommittee has also been tasked with resolving several other outstanding issues, the panel’s chairman Bennie Thompson said. They include what materials to share with the Justice Department before the end of December, and its response to Trump and Republican lawmakers who have not complied with subpoenas.

A reminder of some of the unfinished business awaiting the January 6 committee as the end of the year – and the end of its mandate – approach:

First, there’s the matter of Donald Trump, At what was likely its final public hearing last month, lawmakers publicly voted to subpoena the former president’s testimony and documents. While Trump was reportedly open to the idea of ​​appearing publicly before a panel he has no love for, he ultimately decided to challenge the subpoena in court. According to Politicothe panel could as soon as today file its response to his legal challenge.

As is typical for congressional select committees, the panel is expected to release a report detailing how the insurrection happened. It will probably be the most anticipated such document since the 9/11 Commission Report released in 2004.

The committee also has to decide whether to make criminal referrals to the justice department. Several members have hinted that Trump’s actions during the insurrection amounted to criminal acts, and referring him to the justice department would be a consequential step. They could also refer some of his former officials to face charges, while Politico reports that the members are also looking into whether Trump and his allies tampered with witnesses.

With Republican takeover only weeks away, January 6 committee looks to wrap up unfinished business

Good morning, US politics blog readers. It’s official: Republicans will take control of the House of Representatives when the new Congress starts on January 3, which means the January 6 committee has only a few weeks left to finish up its investigation into the attack on the Capitol. The bipartisan panel is still interviewing witnesses with knowledge of Donald Trump‘s actions and is expected to release a report before the year is finished. Meanwhile, Politicoreports that they may as soon as today respond to the former president’s attempt to quash their subpoena compelling his testimony.

Here’s what else we can expect today:

  • Trump and Florida governor Ron DeSantis will both address the Republican Jewish Coalition National Leadership Meeting along with a host of other conservatives. However, since the former president is appearing virtually, it does not appear he’ll be in the same room as the Florida governor, who has recently emerged as his rival.

  • Joe Biden has returned to Washington from a long trip to Egypt and Asia, and will hold a public event with labor and business leaders at 1 pm eastern time.

  • Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell released a statement of congratulations to Nancy Pelosi late yesterday evening after she announced she’d leave Democratic leadership. Kevin McCarthythe incoming House Republican leader, has yet to do so.

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